Comedy Tropes Book Tag [ORIGINAL]

Happy April Storytellers! It may be April Fool’s Day, but I can promise you there will be no rickrolls or jump scares in this post — instead today I bring you, an original tag based on Comedy Tropes, because tags are fun and comedy is fun … and some books are fun!

You don’t have to answer all (or any) of the prompts with books that actually made you laugh since humor is completely subjective, though you get cool points if you can find at least a few that are funny. A time was had writing these prompts, so I hope you enjoy!

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Sitcom: A book/series whose setting you would love to move into.

The Inkworld trilogy is a book series about a book called Inkheart, making it delightfully meta and a natural choice for this prompt … because the only thing better than living in a book would possibly be living in a book that’s inside another book!

Cringe Comedy: A book that gave you secondhand embarrassment.

I know The Girl on the Train is a little bit of a polarizing title, where some people loved it and others hated it and some people are conflicted or have no opinion–oh wait that’s every book ever, anywhoo personally I really didn’t like any of the characters because I found them really judgmental and narrow-minded, and I know enough people like that in real life/on the interwebs.

Comic Fantasy: A book that doesn’t take itself too seriously.

This could almost be the premise of Furiously Happy: A Funny Book About Horrible Things (though I didn’t choose any of these prompts with specific books in mind); although it’s a memoir, i.e. nonfiction, it’s intensely relatable and comforting and I liked it. It made me laugh.

Dramedy: A book that made you want to break out the popcorn.

My review of Crimson Bound actually commented on the “enthralling drama,” so although a lot of books make me want to break out the popcorn (because popcorn is yummy and tbh I will take any excuse to have some) I’ll pick this one.

Giggling Villain: A book with a complex and memorable antagonist/antihero.

The Young Elites is dark, dark, dark. The main protagonist, Adelina, is dark; the second protagonist, Enzo, is dark; the antagonist, Teren, is dark; the whole book is twisty and wow what even is morality?

Parody: A book that is based on/inspired by another book/fairytale/etc.

Friends, I read a lot of adaptations. But For Darkness Shows the Stars stood out to me because it’s a dystopian version of Jane Austen’s Persuasion, which is certainly much less adapted than Pride and Prejudice or any of the popular fairytales, and it’s a fascinating mix of the original inspiration and the author’s own creations. Also we’re a sucker for a pretty cover. Like wow, just look at it fam.

Rom-com: The book/series that contains your OTP [One True Pairing] of OTPs.

This question was meant to be impossible but it stays muahahahahahaha *coughs*. Honestly, I’m just going to pick Love, Rosie because it’s cute and funny and wholesome. There.

Rant Comedy: A book that deals prominently with social issues (either well or poorly incorporated, your pick!).

With the bonus of being funny, The Gentleman’s Guide to Vice and Virtue (and its sequel, The Lady’s Guide to Petticoats and Piracy) is relatively unique in that it focuses on diverse characters in a historical setting and how that setting influences their lives – without excusing discrimination or privilege “for historical accuracy”! Also, the romance is pretty adorable.

Stand-up Comedy: An indie or self-published book that you loved.

At an age where I didn’t really like YA contemporary, Instructions for a Broken Heart changed my mind and presented me with a a protagonist I related strongly to without having shared her experiences. (I’ve never been to Italy, and at the time I had never had my heart broken either.) It’s cute and it’s underrated.

Self-Referential Humor: A book that breaks the fourth wall.

Even the synopsis of A Series of Unfortunate Events is addressed to the reader (and I am beyond delighted that the Netflix series translates that into scenes where the on-screen Lemony Snicket talks directly to the camera and the viewers at home!). Also, Lemony Snicket is an amazing writer. All y’all should go read the books, then watch the show. In that order.

Toilet Humor: A middle grade/children’s book that you enjoyed.

The Dreadful Tale of Prosper Redding is another funny book! It’s just a little bit creepy, with strong Halloween vibes, and the characters and plot are fantastic. 10/10 would recommend.


TAGGED:

Anyone who wants to waddle to this! Consider yourself tagged!

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THE CONFESSIONAL

*sings with Usher* These are my confessions…

A time was had writing all of this post, actually, because ……….. I’M NOT SAM.

Happy April Fool’s from Isabelle @ BookwyrmBites!

Virtual cookies for everyone who finds and comments on all the blog posts involved in today’s little prank, and bonus chocolate if you can guess at least one before the reveal! 🍪🍪🍪🍫

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What are some of your favorite comedy tropes? Let me know!

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12 thoughts on “Comedy Tropes Book Tag [ORIGINAL]

  1. I might just dig out my old copies of A Series of Unfortunate Events, I loved them so much! Especially the one where the hotel was actually a library – I wanted to be Dewey, the librarian 😊 Jasper Fforde’s ‘Thursday Next’ books are pretty funny, in a surreal kind of way.

    Liked by 2 people

      1. No, I haven’t got Netflix 😭 I’ve seen the Jim Carrey film, which, tbh, didn’t really blow me away. That was the really cool thing about those books, they taught you loads of unusual words and phrases!

        Liked by 2 people

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