Bookish

T5W: Children’s Books to Read As An Adult

t5w

Top 5 Wednesday is a weekly book meme that was created and moderated by Lainey but is now hosted by Sam (not me). If you want to find out more about this group/feature or if you wanna join in on all this fun, you can visit the Goodreads group here!

This weeks topic is a blast from the past. Literally. Like #throwbackthursday has nothing on this topic which is all about children’s books that deserve to be revisited as we grow older. A caveat to this month’s topic is to try and stray away from Harry Potter, because well…it’s Harry Potter and literally can be applied to anything.

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The Hidden Staircase (Nancy Drew Mystery Stories, #2)5. Nancy Drew Series by Carolyn Keene

Nancy and her mysteries are a classic. You could literally be 80 years old and with dentures and still get a kick out of Nancy’s politeness and modesty all the while her oddly on point sleuthing skills.

 

 

4. Anne of Green Gables by L. M. Montgomery

763588Growing up Anne Shirley was the spunky kid that I aspired to be like and sometimes I find myself reaching back to those memories of reading of her adventures and her zest for life and what it had to offer; and with those memories I found a new sense of who I am, or who I can still be. Anne is a character that I believe transcends time, she has this ability to relate not only to children but to adults who have experienced the harshness and joys of life. Because, with every book in this series, you find yourself gaining a different perspective of the story, thus opening your eyes to a new aspect of life that you never really knew existed.

The Chronicles of Narnia (Chronicles of Narnia, #1-7)3.  The Chronicles of Narnia by C.S. Lewis

This honestly is a timeless classic that will probably go down with infamy as with the rest of this list. The Chronicles of Narnia are one of the legendary children’s books of all time and has principles that I believe could apply to the average adult to this day. It gave kids a door to a world of magic and imagination, and I believe that if we re-read this book as adults, we would be reminded of that same child-like imagination–that same magic. It was a fantasy that created memories and showed us what it was to live, maybe as we grow older we will find another perspective in the mysterious world of Narnia.

Elsie's Endless Wait (A Life of Faith: Elsie Dinsmore #1)2. Elsie Dinsmore by Martha Finley

Honestly, this series right here changed my life growing up. Elsie taught me so much throughout the years, and every time I go back to re-read this series I am struck by how much I still haven’t learned or really haven’t grasped yet. Her stubbornness to stand for what she believed in and her never ending positivity and determination has always (and probably will continue to) inspired me and pushed me to apply those same traits to my own life.

The Lord of the Rings (The Lord of the Rings, #1-3)1. The Hobbit/ Lord of the Rings trilogy by J.R.R. Tolkien

I’m not even sure that you can consider this book to be a children’s book, but I was read these stories since I was a newborn so I’m counting it. What can I really say about this that you don’t already know? LOTR and the Hobbit are probably right there with Harry Potter for books you can still read when you realize that bills are a thing and sadly unavoidable. The world within these books are so vast and so intricate that to this day I am still learning different aspects of this story that I never knew before. Like the others on this list, you learn something every time you read these books; but honestly–I think that statement is the truest with these books. Tolkien built a world that could penetrate the minds of not only the youngest but the oldest. It is simply magic…and everyone needs magic in their life.

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Let me know in the comments what Children’s book you love to re-read!

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4 thoughts on “T5W: Children’s Books to Read As An Adult”

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